Last edited by Faurg
Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

3 edition of Soviet agriculture found in the catalog.

Soviet agriculture

Soviet agriculture

an assessment of its contributions to economic development

  • 149 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Praeger in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Soviet Union,
  • Soviet Union.
    • Subjects:
    • Agriculture -- Soviet Union.,
    • Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- Soviet Union.,
    • Soviet Union -- Economic conditions.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statementedited by Harry G. Shaffer.
      SeriesPraeger special studies in international economics and development
      ContributionsShaffer, Harry G.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsS469.R9 S644
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxvi, 166 p. ;
      Number of Pages166
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4540874M
      ISBN 100030219760
      LC Control Number77007512

      "Soviet Agriculture Today: A Radio Broadcast Series" was designed to produce and disseminate to rural Americans information that would provide them with a better understanding of past, present, and future trends in Soviet agriculture. The need for such information is clear, if for no other reason than because. A brief unfavorable review of the Laird-Crowley book containing the papers and background reports presented at the February symposium at the Institute for the Study of the USSR in Munich. Written after the bad harvest of and before Khrushchev's removal, several of .

        The book is illustrated with propaganda posters that graphically portray the drama and trauma of the revolution in Soviet agriculture under Stalin. In chilling detail, the author describes how the havoc and destruction wrought in the countryside sowed . Addeddate Identifier Identifier-ark ark://t17m5nb0p Ocr ABBYY FineReader Ppi Scanner Internet Archive Python library

      The Private Sector in Soviet Agriculture. by Karl-Eugen Wädekin (Author), George F. Karcz (Editor) January ; First Edition; Hardcover $, £ Paperback $, £; Title Details. Rights: Available worldwide Pages: ISBN: Soviet Agriculture. Although the Soviet Union had the world's largest soil resources, climatic and hydrological conditions made farming a high-risk venture, even within the most favorable zone.


Share this book
You might also like
Magnolia Dreams

Magnolia Dreams

The sword of wisdom

The sword of wisdom

HEALTHGATE DATA CORP.

HEALTHGATE DATA CORP.

Pension promises and employmrnt rights

Pension promises and employmrnt rights

Case studies of delivery and cost of bilingual education

Case studies of delivery and cost of bilingual education

ACT 36

ACT 36

Having it all.

Having it all.

Wood ant wars

Wood ant wars

Easter.

Easter.

Christotherapy

Christotherapy

White knights and poison pills

White knights and poison pills

Embryology of the baboon [by] Andrew G. Hendrickx.

Embryology of the baboon [by] Andrew G. Hendrickx.

African American genealogical research

African American genealogical research

Consolidation of telephone systems.

Consolidation of telephone systems.

Dungeons & Dragons Character Record Sheets (D&D Accessory)

Dungeons & Dragons Character Record Sheets (D&D Accessory)

Soviet agriculture Download PDF EPUB FB2

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), Rus. Soyuz Sovetskikh Sotsialisticheskikh Respublik, former republic. It was established in and dissolved in The Soviet Union was the first state to be based on Marxist socialism (see also Marxism; communism).Until the Communist party indirectly controlled all levels of government; the party's politburo effectively ruled the country.

"Soviet Agriculture" by the plant physiologist turned historian in exile Zhores Medvedev was written shortly before Bolshevism lost its power in the U.S.S.R. Medvedev did not foresee that, but he did identify agriculture as the critical failure of the government and party, which had to be corrected if the economic system were not to collapse.5/5(2).

Consequently, Soviet agriculture imploded. In the Nikita Khrushchev admitted that despite the more highly-mechanized farming techniques in the collectives “Soviet agriculture was producing less grain per capita and few cattle absolutely than had been achieved by the muzhik with his wooden plough under Tsarism forty years earlier” (p.

).Cited by: This book examines the Soviet agricultural crisis of which culminated in the major famine of It is the first volume in English to make extensive use of Russian and Ukrainian central and local archives to assess the extent and causes of the famine.

It reaches new conclusions on how. In the present volume, Davies and Wheatcroft pick up in the middle of the story that Davies began in volumes one and two (The Socialist Offensive: The Collectivization of Soviet Agriculture, and The Soviet Collective Farm, ), with chapters on the second campaigns of collectivization and dekulakization in These.

Get this from a library. Soviet agriculture. [Zhores A Medvedev] -- Describes agriculture in the Soviet Union before and after the Revolution, discusses livestock, food production, mechanization, chemicals, and private agriculture, and identifies key problems.

The Years of Hunger: Soviet Agriculture, was published in the early s and is becoming a staple for understanding industrialization and agriculture under Stalin. This book provides the most thorough and least biased understanding of collectivization/5. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Morozov, V.A.

(Vladimir Aleksandrovich). Soviet agriculture. Moscow: Progress Publishers, (OCoLC) Once the foodbasket of Europe, the Soviet Union is now the world's largest importer of grain and livestock productsyet a staggering 35% of the country's investment budget goes to agriculture, accordin.

A historical analysis of Soviet agriculture by the noted biochemist, author of the recent Gorbachev (). The conventional view ascribes the problems of Soviet agriculture to Stalin's excesses, particularly the Lysenko era of pseudo-scientific biology.

This book, first published inanalyses the institutions and decision-making processes that determined agricultural production in the Soviet Union. It addresses the crisis in Soviet agriculture of the early s, examining the problems of low productivity, adverse natural conditions and an underdeveloped by:   Book review by Professor Mark Tauger, Department of History, West Virginia University, review published in (Economic History Association), November Reviewing: R.W.

Wheatcroft and Stephen G. Davies; The Years of Hunger: Soviet Agriculture, ; New York: Palgrave Macmillan, xvii + pp, ISBN: (This volume is the fifth volume in the series on. Secretary of Agriculture Edward Madigan discussed the state of Soviet agriculture in remarks delivered to the National Press Club.

Earlier, in a joint news conference with Soviet President Mikhail. Book Description. This book, first published inanalyses the institutions and decision-making processes that determined agricultural production in the Soviet Union.

It addresses the crisis in Soviet agriculture of the early s, examining the problems of low productivity, adverse natural conditions and an underdeveloped infrastructure.

By the summer of Soviet industrialisation was well under way, but agriculture was in a profound crisis: in and grain to feed the towns was wrested from the peasants by force, and the twenty-five million individual peasant households lost the stimulus to extend or even to maintain.

He is an associate professor of history at West Virginia University. He is the author of the book Agriculture in World History. His writings on Soviet agriculture— articles, book chapters, and reviews–are listed on his website at West Virginia University. The list is enclosed below.

The Soviet Union implemented the collectivization (Russian: Коллективизация) of its agricultural sector between and during the ascension of Joseph began during and was part of the first five-year policy aimed to integrate individual landholdings and labour into collectively-controlled and state-controlled farms: Kolkhozy and Sovkhozy accordingly.

An Analysis of Soviet Agriculture - Volume 11 Issue 1 - Alexander Gerschenkron. 2 It is true that in an early passage of the book Jasny says: “Much has been written on the great Soviet reorganization drive in general and the collectivization of peasant farming in particular.

The appraisals range from enthusiastic acclaim to prophecies of complete failure, with extreme views greatly. How did the Soviet peasants react to these changes. What impact did Soviet agriculture have on the overall economy of the country. These are all questions that are taken into account.

The book is arranged in chapters representing different time by:   An eminent scholar of Soviet history at Princeton University, Kotkin picks up where he left off in Volume 1 — the eve of Stalin’s decision to collectivize Soviet agriculture — and Author: Mark Atwood Lawrence.

But Soviet agriculture had so far remained stubbornly inefficient and resistant to change. In this book Stefan Hedlund investigates the reasons for this state of affairs. The author gives an account of the emergence, development and performance of private agriculture in the Soviet Union.

But Soviet agriculture had so far remained stubbornly inefficient and resistant to change. In this book Stefan Hedlund investigates the reasons for this state of affairs. The author gives an account of the emergence, development and performance of private agriculture in the Soviet by: Soviet plans for agriculture have failed more frequently than they have succeeded over the course of the past fifty years of socialized agriculture.

Failure, however, is a relative term which tells us nothing of the magnitude of the goals set, nor of the results achieved.